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Problems occur when the pelvic floor or abdomen muscles do not function properly, causing pain or incontinence. It can affect both men and women, but is more common in women. In many cases, pelvic floor treatment and pelvic floor dysfunction can occur throughout the lifespan.Associated symptoms can include:

Urinary frequency, urgency, hesitation or incontinence.   

Constipation or loose stools.    Sexual dysfunction, including painful intercourse.    Pain in the pelvic region, in the lower abdomen, in the lower back, in the sacroiliac joint or in the coccyx.The following conditions treated are the most common:    Urinary incontinence, frequency, urgency and hesitation.

  • Chronic pelvic pain.    Dyspareunia and vaginismus.    Vulvodynia.    Prolapse of the pelvic organs.    Pregnancy or postpartum pain, muscle imbalance or weakness.    Post-surgical care following abdominal or pelvic surgery.Causes of pain!Pelvic painTypes of painThe localization of pain concerns the lower part of the abdomen and pelvis.
  • In women, P. pain can refer to symptoms arising from the reproductive, urinary, or digestive system, or from musculoskeletal sources. Depending on the origin, the pain can be:    Deaf or acute.
  • Constant or intermittent.    Mild, moderate or severe.P. pain can sometimes radiate to the lower back, buttocks, or thighs. Sometimes, you may notice P. pain only at certain times, such as when you urinate or during sexual activity. It can occur:    Suddenly, sharply and briefly (sharp).

Long-term (chronic). Chronic P. pain refers to any constant or intermittent P. pain that has been present for at least three months.Sudden and unexpected pelvic painP. pain that occurs suddenly for the first time is called acute P. pain. In these cases it is important to consult a doctor as soon as possible.

Common causes of acute P. painThe most common causes of acute pain in women who are not pregnant are:An ovarian cyst – a fluid-filled sac that develops on an ovary and causes P. pain when it bursts or twists.

Acute pelvic inflammatory disease – a bacterial infection of the uterus, fallopian tubes or ovaries, which often follows a chlamydial or gonorrhea infection and requires immediate treatment with antibiotics.Appendicitis – a painful swelling of the appendix (a finger-like pocket connected to the large intestine) which usually causes pain in the lower right part of the abdomen (belly).

Peritonitis – inflammation of the peritoneum (the thin layer of tissue that lines the inside of the abdomen); causes sudden abdominal pain which gradually becomes more severe and requires immediate medical treatment.

A urinary tract infection – you will probably also have pain or a burning sensation when you urinate, and you may need to urinate more often.Constipation or intestinal spasm – this can be caused by changes in diet, medications, irritable bowel syndrome or, in rare cases, by intestinal obstruction.

Long-term pelvic pain

If you’ve had pain for 3 months or more that comes and goes or is continuous, it’s known as chronic P. pain. Chronic pain is more intense than normal menstrual pain and lasts longer. It affects around 1 in 6 women. See your GP if you have chronic P. pain.
Common causes of chronic pelvic pain

The most common causes of chronic P. pain are:

Endometriosis.Chronic pelvic inflammatory disease – a bacterial infection of the uterus, fallopian tubes or ovaries, which often follows a chlamydial or gonorrhea infection and requires immediate treatment with antibiotics.Irritable bowel syndrome – a common long-term condition of the digestive system that can cause stomach cramps, bloating, diarrhea and constipation.

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